Premier Member Profile

Excell Design

Contact: Richard Excell
Address: 16 Alexandra Villas, Brighton, East Sussex, BN1 3RF
T: 01273 964065 | M: 07789 035553
.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) | Company Website

Excell Design is a full-service design studio with expertise and experience in producing brand identities, advertising campaigns, print communications…

Listed in: Advertising & Design

Most networking groups include an opportunity for networkers to stand up and make a brief presentation to the rest of the room: it’s a 60-second opportunity to show people who you are and what exactly it is you do. The fist time you do this might seem slightly daunting but at least what you have to say will be news to everyone else in the room. The tricky part is keeping what you have to say relevant, fresh and interesting, particularly when the people you are presenting to have heard it all before.

Once people begin to get to know you and your business; they will want to hear something new about you every time you stand up rather than the same old story. In advance of each presentation, try and plan a new and different theme to avoid repeating and boring your audience. Take time to think of things related to you and your area of business that enlightens your listeners and inspires them to think, then take action.

You could begin by asking them a question or telling them a short and amusing anecdote or incident, then introduce your name and your company clearly. Rather than go into great detail about what you do, focus on the benefits of how your business helps others by solving a problem, for example: saving them valuable time, saving them money, offering resources they lack or expertise they need. Don’t try and cover all of these in one minute flat, instead take one or two of the benefits and illustrate them as effectively as you can in the time you have to make a positive impression.

You can use props and visuals to demonstrate your point, for example bring an item in that can be passed around the group while you speak or show them a visual that highlights an important point. You could use a testimonial from a client to back up a positive claim you make or a staggering (and reliable of course) statistic to add emphasis. Real examples of your work speak volumes and will engage your audience far more than generalisation.

You can be topical and relate recent news to your business and the business of others in the room. This will have wider appeal and relevance than just plain theory and speculation. Give out some free advice if you can on how to achieve something or a solution to a common problem if possible as these tips will add value to the content of your presentation and show you are generous and willing to pass on the benefits of your experience freely.

make your minute count